There are three main signals you will need to use when riding your bike to indicate to other road users what you intend to do. But you should always maintain control of your bike. If you need to stop quickly and don't have time to signal, or you’re turning at the bottom of a large hill, it's more important to have both hands on the brakes and slow effectively than to indicate and maneuver at an unsafe speed.

Signalling left

Turning left 

Raise your left arm directly out to your side so it is parallel with the ground. Make sure the back of your hand faces the road users behind you, not up to the sky. Hold this position for 3 seconds and return your hand to your handlebars.

Signalling right 

Turning right 

Raise your right arm directly out to your side so it's parallel with the ground. Make sure the back of your hand faces the road users behind you, not up to the sky. Hold this position for 3 seconds and return your hands to the handlebars.

 Signalling slow stop

Slowing/stopping 

Raise your right arm directly out to your side then make a 90deg angle in your elbow by raising your hand toward the sky. Make sure the back of your hand faces the road users behind you, not up to the side. Hold this position for 3 seconds and return your hands to the handlebars.

Remember to only make these signals if it's safe to do so and you have control of your bike.

 

Hook turn edit

 

Hook turns - how to do one

Use a hook turn when you don’t feel comfortable doing a right turn from a right hand lane. It could be at a busy intersection or crossing a multiple-lane road.

1. Keep in the cycle lane, the left lane or the left-most lane that goes straight ahead.


2. Cycle across the intersection when the way is clear or the traffic signal, for going straight ahead, turns green.


3. Stop the in the marked area of road just before the footpath. If there is not a marked place, stop ahead of the lane for the direction you wish to travel in. When choosing a place to stop look out for:

  • Pedestrians crossing
  • Traffic behind you that is travelling straight ahead
  • Traffic that will want to turn left from the second arm of the intersection.

 

4. Wait until the way is clear, or the traffic signals on the other side of the road turn green and then cycle across the intersection keeping left.

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Cycling is a smart investment. The environment, economy and all road users benefit from it. Cities around the world are making changes to support cycling as a way to provide people with transport choice, and we are doing the same in Wellington.This s...

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